Hearing

Google Glass Apps for People with Disability Trialed by Telstra


Author: Media Access Australia 

Published By: Media Access Australia 

Published:  2016 

"The potential benefits of Google Glass for people with disability are becoming a reality thanks to a partnership between Telstra and app developers b2cloud.

Two Telstra employees – Kelly Schulz, who is blind, and Peter Miller, who is hearing impaired – were each given a Google Glass device with assistive apps installed. “These apps have been developed to see what could be done with technology to make the lives of hearing and vision impaired people a little easier,” said Telstra on itsblog(link is external).

In the video embedded below, Schulz demonstrates shopping using an optical recognition app on her Glass device. The app identifies a bag of peas and reads out the label. “To have that hands-free ability to identify objects, being connected to a fast network, being connected to the world and have it all private in your ear, on your head – fantastic!” said Schulz.

For Miller, an app provides a transcript of conversations in real time right before his eyes. “I can be a more active participant in meetings and conversations and I can walk into any meeting whatsoever without needing to book any special [captioning] services,” he said.

Tim O’Leary, Telstra’s Chief Sustainability Officer, said, “It’s the same technology for able people and people with disability. […] There’s a real sort of equity I think with the technology. The design is the same for everybody and that makes a huge difference for people’s self-esteem.”

Although Google Glass is not yet available to purchase in Australia, projects such as this will help ensure that the benefits of the technology for people with disability are realised by the time it enters the market. However, price may be a barrier for some with the device currently selling for over US$2,000."

Category: Hearing Smart AT General

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Google Glass Apps for People with Disability Trialed by Telstra


 Author: Media Access Australia

Published by: Media Access Australia

Published: 2012

"The potential benefits of Google Glass for people with disability are becoming a reality thanks to a partnership between Telstra and app developers b2cloud.

Two Telstra employees – Kelly Schulz, who is blind, and Peter Miller, who is hearing impaired – were each given a Google Glass device with assistive apps installed. “These apps have been developed to see what could be done with technology to make the lives of hearing and vision impaired people a little easier,” said Telstra on itsblog(link is external).

In the video embedded below, Schulz demonstrates shopping using an optical recognition app on her Glass device. The app identifies a bag of peas and reads out the label. “To have that hands-free ability to identify objects, being connected to a fast network, being connected to the world and have it all private in your ear, on your head – fantastic!” said Schulz.

For Miller, an app provides a transcript of conversations in real time right before his eyes. “I can be a more active participant in meetings and conversations and I can walk into any meeting whatsoever without needing to book any special [captioning] services,” he said.

Tim O’Leary, Telstra’s Chief Sustainability Officer, said, “It’s the same technology for able people and people with disability. […] There’s a real sort of equity I think with the technology. The design is the same for everybody and that makes a huge difference for people’s self-esteem.”

Although Google Glass is not yet available to purchase in Australia, projects such as this will help ensure that the benefits of the technology for people with disability are realised by the time it enters the market. However, price may be a barrier for some with the device currently selling for over US$2,000."

Access the full story here: http://www.mediaaccess.org.au/latest_news/digital-technology/google-glass-apps-for-people-with-disability-trialled-by-telstra

Category: Hearing Smart AT General

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Online hub developed to assist people with hearing loss


Author/s: Natasha Egan

Published By: Technology Review

Published On: November 16, 2015

A new website aims to provide a one-stop hub for people who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech-impaired to discover new technology and learn from experts and peers about which products may help them.

Techfinder has been developed by not-for-profit organisation Conexu Foundation, which seeks advances in communication technology to improve the connectedness of deaf, hard of hearing and speech impaired Australians through education, research and advocacy.

Conexu chief strategy officer Rachel McKay said one in six Australians is affected by hearing loss but surveys show half of them were unaware of the myriad tech products and communication tools that could help. That, or they were simply overwhelmed by the constantly evolving technology now available, she said.

The website has been designed with the input of focus groups to make it useful and user-friendly and draws on the knowledge of experts at the cutting-edge of technology around the world to provide the latest information.

Techfinder aims to respond to the day-to-day needs of people and addresses all aspects of a person’s life from learning to working and socialising.

Site features include:

product reviews

tech resources

blogs

forums

how-to guides

ideo tutorials

Visit www.techfinder.org.au or www.conexu.net.au for more information or watch an explanation video, which is available in audio and Auslan versions: Welcome to Techfinder.org.au Video



To view the original article go to:  Technology Review


Category: Hearing Videos

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 1 year ago

A pilot study of telepractice delivery for teaching listening and spoken language to children with hearing loss


Contributors: Gabriella Constantinescu, Monique Waite, Dimity Dornan, Emma Rushbrooke, Jackie Brown1, Jane McGovern,

Michelle Ryan1 and Anne Hill

Published By: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, by Sage Publishing

Published On: 2014

 

Auditory-Verbal Therapy (AVT) is an early intervention approach for teaching listening and spoken language to children with hearing loss.

However, conventional in person AVT services may not be accessible for children with hearing loss living in rural and remote areas. Thus children in rural and remote areas are at risk of further isolation in their community as they struggle to achieve their full potential in education, vocation and society. Telemedicine (also known as telepractice in this context) may improve access to specialised treatment like AVT for children with hearing loss and a number of programmes are emerging.

In Queensland, the Hear and Say organization provides both in person AVT and a telepractice programme (eAVT).

The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of the eAVT programme in promoting the spoken language development of young children with hearing loss.















Category: Hearing Rural & Remote Service Delivery

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 1 year ago

Telemedicine clinics and mobile health screening services for Indigenous children


Author: The Centre for Online Health (COH)

Published By: The University of Australia 

Published:  2016


HealtheScreen4KIDS is a service by the Centre for Online Health 

Since 2005, staff at the Centre for Online Health (COH) have been exploring the use of telemedicine to support Indigenous children in rural communities. In 2009, a mobile telemedicine-enabled health screening service was established in Cherbourg, a remote Aboriginal community in central Queensland.The service, designed to complement and extend existing community-based service, provides routine assessment of children at high risk of ear disease and potential hearing impairment. The screening service comprises a custom-designed screening van with the necessary telemedicine equipment on board. 

 To read more information go to;

  http://www.uq.edu.au/coh/health-e-screen-4-kids

 

Category: ATSI Service Delivery Hearing Rural & Remote Service Delivery

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago