Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Webinar: Smart Assistive Technology Driving Changes in Management of Continence


Author: CCSATC & Simavita

Published By: CCSATC 

Published On: 17 March 2016

In this webinar, Leonie Mulheran from Simavita will discuss the prevalence of incontinence and importance of management in both the younger and the aged population and gender specific issues. Importantly, Leonie will discuss the role that Smart Assistive Technology could play for the Service Provider & the Consumer as well as economic impact and future possibilities. 

This webinar can be accessed by following the link below:

Smart Assistive Technology Driving Changes in Management of Continence

Category: Domestic Assistance Future Trends & Possibilies Local Perspectives Mobile Technologies Quality & Standards Smart AT General Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Uninvited Guests


Author: Superflux, Jon Ardem, Alexandra Fruhstorfer, Jon Flint 

Published By: Vimeo

Published: 2015 

"Uninvited Guests is a short film that explores the frictions between an elderly man and his smart home.  Thomas, aged 70, lives on his own after his wife died last year. His children send him smart devices to track and monitor his diet, health and sleep from a distance. But Thomas has always been fiercely independent, happy to live in an organised mess. He struggles with the order and rules imposed on him by the objects that are meant to make his life easier. In a world where ’smart objects’ will increasingly be used to provide care at a distance, how will we live with these uninvited guests? This film was created by Superflux Lab for the ThingTank project."

For further information visit: http://www.superflux.in/work/uninvited-guests

Watch at: https://vimeo.com/128873380



Category: Domestic Assistance Future Trends & Possibilies Local Perspectives Mobile Technologies Robotics Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Learnings from Scotland’s Innovation Programs - Janette Hughes


Author: Janette Hughes and CCSATC 

Published By: CCSATC

Published On: 6 January 2016


Janette lead the Wellness and Health Innovation project and most recently the Scottish ‘dallas’ programme – Living it Up, which developed a transformational and scalable digital service model for the over 50’s, focussed on co-designing services that enable them to remain healthy, happy and safe.  This webinar gives a brief overview of the Scottish ‘dallas’ Living it Up Program.

This webinar can be accessed by following the link below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqXuCILAmB



Category: Allied Health Connected Health Domestic Assistance Future Trends & Possibilies International Perspectives Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Youngcare’s Share House sets new standard for disability housing


Author: Architecture & Access

Published By: Architecture & Access 

Published On: 9 September 2014

Four excited young Queenslanders moved into their brand new share house in mid-July, a special milestone for any young person and, in this case, a significant one for disability housing in Australia.

“Through our building program we create accommodation where young Australians with high care needs can enjoy the same lifestyle as others their age, living an independent life with appropriate and dignified care,” says Youngcare CEO Samantha Kennerley.

Patricia Flores, senior access consultant and State Manager of Architecture & Access in Queensland provided consultancy services, and was delighted to attend the public preview day of the Share House.

“It is a privilege to be associated with this project, which is clearly pioneering best practice in design as it responds to an issue of critical importance,” says Patricia. “It is incredible to think that over 7,000 young Australians are living in aged care because there is nowhere else for them to go.”

The Wooloowin Share House design is underpinned by what is believed to be the first research of its kind in Australia, undertaken by Youngcare and Griffith University, into what young people need and want.

The hub of the house includes a spacious communal living area and kitchen, and each resident has their own balcony, bathroom, bedroom and kitchenette.

This home is distinctive for the innovative use of assistive technology, where lighting, audio, visual, automated doors and blinds are controlled at the touch of a fingertip, allowing for optimal independence.

“Having the right place to live will make all the difference to these young people’s enjoyment of greater freedom of movement, dignity and independence in daily life,” says Patricia.

For more information about this project visit the Youngcare website.

To view the full article go to  http://www.architectureandaccess.com.au/youngcares-share-house-sets-new-standard-for-disability-housing/

 

 

Category: Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 1 year ago

Smart rehabilitation for the 21st century: The Tampa Smart Home for veterans with traumatic brain injury


 

Author/s: Jan Jasiewicz, PhD; William Kearns, PhD;  Jeffrey Craighead, PhD; James L. Fozard, PhD; Steven Scott, DO; Jay McCarthy Jr, PT, MS

Published By: JRRD, Volume 48, Number 8

Published On: 2011

 

In this editorial, JRRD report on the development of a smart-home–based cognitive prosthetic that will deliver 24/7 rehabilitation at the James A.Haley Veterans’ Hospital Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Program (PTRP) facility in Tampa, Florida. The Tampa Smart Home was designed to address two weaknesses identified by PTRP clinicians in the rehabilitation process for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI): (1) patient safety and (2) inadequate timing and repetition of prompts used to overcome TBI related cognitive and memory deficits.

Category: International Perspectives Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 1 year ago

Temporo-spacial prompting for persons with cognitive impairment using smart wrist-worn interface


Author/s: William Kearns, PhD; Jan M. Jasiewicz, PhD; James L. Fozard, PhD; Paul Webster, PhD; Steven Scott, DO; Jeffrey Craighead, PhD; Mary E. Bowen, PhD; Joseph McCarthy, PT, MS

Published By: JRRD, Volume 50, Number 10

Published On: 2013

 In this editorial, JRRD report on the development of a smartwatch designed to enhance the Smart Home at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital in Tampa, a project that uses advanced tracking technology to help Veteran patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) independently plan, organize, and complete everyday activities [1]. The literature is replete with examples of proposed technologies designed to influence or control behavior, the most recent incarnation being "persuasive technologies".

Category: Mobile Technologies Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 1 year ago

The Social and Psychological Aspects of Smart Home Technology within the Care Sector


Author: Guy Dewsbury 

Published By: Scottish Centre of Environmental Design Research (SEARCH)

Published On: August 2005


The observations within this paper stem from undertaking a number of workshops and consultations on the use of Smart Home Technology within the social care field. Within these consultations, certain common themes evolved from the discussions that the author attempts to address herein. Most frequently, the issues centered on the relationship between technology and the person with disabilities.

Category: Operational Technology Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Smart homes – Current Features and Future Perspectives


In an ageing world, maintaining good health and independence for as long as possible is essential. Instead of hospitalization or institutionalization, the elderly and disabled can be assisted in their own environment 24 h a day with numerous ‘smart’ devices. The concept of the smart home is a promising and cost-effective way of improving home care for the elderly and the disabled in a non-obtrusive way, allowing greater independence, maintaining good health and preventing social isolation. Smart homes are equipped with sensors, actuators, and/or biomedical monitors. The devices operate in a network connected to a remote centre for data collection and processing. The remote centre diagnoses the ongoing situation and initiates assistance procedures as required. The technology can be extended to wearable and in vivo implantable devices to monitor people 24 h a day both inside and outside the house. This review describes a selection of projects in developed countries on smart homes examining the various technologies available. Advantages and disadvantages, as well as the impact on modern society, are discussed. Finally, future perspectives on smart homes as part of a home-based health care network are presented.

Category: Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Influencing Factors in the Design of Smart Homes for Persons with Disabilities


UTARI collaborated with H-E-B and Operation Finally Home to provide technology and research integration of automated and robotic devices in home settings.  In 2014, we supported the development of two (2) Smart Homes to benefit wounded warriors. Read more about the HEB Project here.


https://youtu.be/LHLK62FL-VQ


This video features Mike McNair 

Mike McNair is the Automation and Intelligent Systems Director at The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute (UTARI).  He joined the Research Institute in October 2013 initially overseeing the research in Unmanned Systems and Assistive Technologies; his responsibilities were later expanded to include oversight in Advanced Manufacturing and Sensor Development.

McNair received a Bachelor’s degree in Physics from Texas A&M University in 1982.  He later received a Master’s degree in Systems Engineering from The George Washington University in 2013.  He also holds an active membership with the Program Management Institute (PMI) with a Project Management Professional (PMP) certification.  His direct unmanned systems experience includes the dual roles of Chief Architect and Chief Software Engineer on a large UGV and UAV System of Systems effort from the U.S. Army.  Included in his background is engineering and project leadership across multiple engineering and application domains.  McNair has authored or coauthored multiple journal and conference publications, is a current member of the SAE AS-4 (JAUS) standards group and has presented at several industry conferences and symposiums.

Category: Connected Health Mobile Technologies Robotics Smart Homes & Environmental Controls Videos

Added by Elizabeth Dodd · 2 years ago

Hft Personalised Technology - Virtual Smart House


http://www.hftsmarthouse.org.uk/#prettyPhoto

Hft uses the term 'Personalised Technology' to describe gadgets and equipment used to support people in this way.

It's not about the technology; it's all about the person using it and the positive impact it has on all those involved.

Although the Virtual Smart House is based on our work with people with learning disabilities, much of the technology showcased in the house can be used equally to support anyone who needs assistance in their own home.

This includes other vulnerable groups such as the elderly, people with dementia and people with physical disabilities

Category: International Perspectives Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Elizabeth Dodd · 2 years ago

Re-conceptualizing disability and assistive technology: Australian consumers driving policy change


Author: Natasha Layton and Erin Wilson

Published By: Technology and Disability Journal

Published On: 2009

For people living with a disability, enablers such as assistive technologies, environmental modifications and personal care can make the difference between living fully and merely existing. This article is written from the standpoints of people with disabilities and professionals in one Australian State who found their government and service system to be a constraining rather than an enabling force. It presents two key components of policy and practice change in the area of assistive technology: challenging understandings of disability, assistive technology, and the desired life outcomes that assistive technology contributes to; and building a public evidence base through consumer-focussed research. In short, government funding of assistive technology needs to move beyond a limited focus on functional needs and take responsibility for fully equipping people to live the lives they aspire to.

Category: Local Perspectives Policy & Funding Quality & Standards Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Support self management:assistive technology to support people with chronic disease



Authors: Huiru Zheng, Chris Nugent, Paul McCullagh, Yan Huang, Shumei Zhang, William Burns, Richard Davies, Norman Black,

Peter Wright, Sue Mawson, Christopher Eccleston, Mark Hawley and Gail Mountain

Published by:Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare

Year of publication: 2010


We have developed a personalised self management system to support self management of chronic conditions with support from health-care professionals. Accelerometers are used to measure gross levels of activity, for example walking around the house, and used to infer higher level activity states, such as standing, sitting and lying. A smart phone containing an accelerometer and a global positioning system (GPS) module can be used to monitor outdoor activity, providing both activity and location based information. Heart rate, blood pressure and weight are recorded and input to the system by the user. A decision support system (DSS) detects abnormal activity and distinguishes life style patterns. The DSS is used to assess the self management process, and automates feedback to the user, consistent with the achievement of their life goals. We have found that telecare and assistive technology is feasible to support self management for chronic conditions within the home and local community environments.





Category: Communication Connected Health Mobile Technologies Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Matching technologies of home automation, robotics, assistance, geriatric telecare and telemedicine


Authors: Francesco Franshimon, PhD and Michiel Brink, MSc

Published by: Journal of Gerontechnology

Year of publication: 2009


The aging society could have a greater societal impact than the current financial crisis. The percentage of older adults has increased while the size of the health care workforce has remained constant. Home automation, robotics, assistive technology, geriatric telecare and telemedicine can support independence in older adults and diminish the health care burden. Currently, delivering services through these technologies is accomplished mainly through stand-alone systems. Multiple stand-alone systems in one dwelling become a multidisciplinary technological challenge of risks and benefits. Ideally, only those technology mediated services requested at a particular moment should be provided. This calls for a reduction in the barriers between healthcare and technology disciplines and an intelligent network using software agents supporting optimal integration and interoperability to increase the quality of life of older adults and decrease the healthcare burden in our aging society.

Category: Communication Connected Health Robotics Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Assistive technologies for the frail elderly, chronic illness sufferers and people with disabilities – a case study of the development of a smart home


This paper reports on initial stages of a case study of building a consortium to undertake research into advanced technologies and telecommunications that support the notion of an assisted care ‘Smart Home’. The aim is to through research and development to provide greater independence, improved quality of life and reduce unnecessary hospital admission for the dependant being cared for in their own homes including the frail elderly, chronic illness sufferers and people with disabilities. The primary outcome is the intent to support families and professional carers, reduce costs and, where possible, identify commercial opportunities for new products and services. Queensland Smart Home Initiative (QSHI) is discussed as a case study together with the Consortium’s first Smart Home at an aged care facility in Queensland, Australia.

Category: Local Perspectives Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Smart home technologies for health and social care support (review)


Authors: S. Martin, G. Kelly, WG. Kernohan, B. McCreight and C. Nugent

Published by: The Cochrane Library

Year of Publication: 2008


People who are ill (physically or mentally), or who are frail, may find it difficult to meet their everyday personal and social needs at home. Healthcare providers are trying to find ways to support more people at home, but finding home care workers and the money to fund this help is challenging. Advances in technology have created new devices to help support people.

New devices are already starting to be used, such as mobile phones tailored to health care, or electronic sensors that sound alarms in emergency situations. Another new technology is sensors. Sensors can be placed in everyday appliances in the home, like the fridge, cooker or the door, and can send information to healthcare providers. Providers can find out how people are doing in their homes and then make decisions about their care, such as how often to visit the home. Homes with these technologies are called ’smart homes’.

As with many new technologies, smart home technologies are often used without first testing if they are effective. This review aimed to determine what effect any type of smart home technologies have on people. The review produced a significant volume of literature on the use of smart technologies within health care, but there were no studies testing their effectiveness. The effects of smart technologies to support people in their homes are not known. Better quality research is needed.

Category: Communication Connected Health International Perspectives Smart Homes & Environmental Controls Social Engagement

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Virtual humans for connected health


Authors: Gunner Gamborg 

Published By: WFOT Bulletin

Published On: May 2015 


There is a growing need for applications that can dynamically interact with aging populations to gather information, monitor their health care, provide information, or even act as companions. Virtual human agents or virtual characters offer a technology that can enable human users to overcome the confusing interfaces found in current human-computer interactions. These artificially intelligent virtual characters have speech recognition, natural language and vision that will allow human users to interact with their computers in a more natural way. Additionally, sensors may be used to monitor the environment for specific behaviors that can be fused into a virtual human system. As a result, the virtual human may respond to a patient or elderly person in a manner that will have a powerful affect on their living situation. This paper will describe the virtual human technology developed and some current applications that apply the technology to virtual patients for mental health diagnosis and clinician training. Additionally the paper will discuss possible ways in which the virtual humans may be utilized for assisted health care and for the integration of multi-modal input to enhance the virtual human system.

Category: Communication Connected Health International Perspectives Medication Management Smart Homes & Environmental Controls Social Engagement

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Re-conceptualizing disability and assistive technology: Australian consumers driving policy change


For people living with a disability, enablers such as assistive technologies, environmental modifications and personal care can make the difference between living fully and merely existing. This article is written from the standpoints of people with disabilities and professionals in one Australian State who found their government and service system to be a constraining rather than an enabling force. It presents two key components of policy and practice change in the area of assistive technology: challenging understandings of disability, assistive technology, and the desired life outcomes that assistive technology contributes to; and building a public evidence base through consumer-focussed research. In short, government funding of assistive technology needs to move beyond a limited focus on functional needs and take responsibility for fully equipping people to live the lives they aspire to.

Category: Local Perspectives Policy & Funding Quality & Standards Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Workplace response to virtual caregiver support and remote home monitoring of elders: the WIN project


Research has demonstrated the health and financial cost to working caregivers of older adults and the cost to business in lost productivity. This paper describes the implementation of the Worker Interactive Networking (WIN) project, a Web-based program designed to support employed caregivers at work. WIN innovatively linked working caregivers via the Internet to home to monitor elders’ status using wireless sensor technology and included an online information and support group for a six-month period.

Twenty-seven employees from thirteen business sites participated. Despite problems with wireless carrier service, feasibility outcomes were achieved. We were able to collect six months of continuous real time data wirelessly from multiple types of homes across 4 states. This model demonstrates that businesses can offer a similar program and not be overwhelmed by employee demand or abuse of technology access. Reluctance to consider home monitoring was apparent and was influenced by familial relationships and values of privacy and independence.

Category: International Perspectives Smart AT General Smart Homes & Environmental Controls Workforces Considerations

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Impact analysis of Smart Assistive Technologies for people with Dementia


Authors: Trudy Yuginovich, Jeffrey Soar and Ying Su

Faculty of Business & Law, University of Southern Queensland

Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China

Year of Publication: 2012


Aims: To trial the use of a range of available Smart Assistive Technologies for people with dementia and their families.


Summary: The disability support and aged care sectors have not to date taken full advantage of assistive and other relevant technologies; there is a massive unmet need for greater support and a significant level of issues that are not addressed. There are a range of potential benefits of Smart Assistive Technologies for people with dementia, their families and carers. This small study confirmed some of these whilst confirmation of other potential benefits will require more research.

Category: Allied Health Communication Domestic Assistance Local Perspectives Regional Service Delivery Robotics Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

The acceptability of assistive technology to older people


Assistive technology (AT) is defined in this paper as ‘any device or system that allows an individual to perform a task that they would otherwise be unable to do, or increases the ease and safety with which the task can be performed’ (Cowan and Turner-Smith 1999). Its importance in contributing to older people’s independence and autonomy is increasingly recognised, but there has been little research into the viability of extensive installations of AT. This paper focuses on the acceptability of AT to older people, and reports one component of a multidisciplinary research project that examined the feasibility, acceptability, costs and outcomes of introducing AT into their homes. Sixty-seven people aged 70 or more years were interviewed in-depth during 2001 to find out about their use and experience of a wide range of assistive technologies. The findings suggest a complex model of acceptability, in which a ‘ felt need’ for assistance combines with ‘product quality’. The paper concludes by considering the tensions that may arise in the delivery of acceptable assistive technology.

Category: Domestic Assistance International Perspectives Smart AT General Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago