Connected Health

Learnings from Scotland’s Innovation Programs - Janette Hughes


Author: Janette Hughes and CCSATC 

Published By: CCSATC

Published On: 6 January 2016


Janette lead the Wellness and Health Innovation project and most recently the Scottish ‘dallas’ programme – Living it Up, which developed a transformational and scalable digital service model for the over 50’s, focussed on co-designing services that enable them to remain healthy, happy and safe.  This webinar gives a brief overview of the Scottish ‘dallas’ Living it Up Program.

This webinar can be accessed by following the link below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqXuCILAmB



Category: Allied Health Connected Health Domestic Assistance Future Trends & Possibilies International Perspectives Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

An Evaluation of House of Memories: Dementia Training Programme


Contributors: Kerry Wilson and Gayle Whelan

Published By: National Museums Liverpool

Published On: September 2014

House of Memories is a multi award-winning museums dementia awareness training programme in the U.K. Created by National Museums Liverpool, it provides health, social care and housing workforce with practical skills and resources to support people to live well with dementia. Since its inception in 2012, more than 5,000 health, housing, and social care workers have participated in the training nationally in the U.K.

Other recent developments attached to the programme include the launch of a dedicated My House of Memories2 app, which can again be used remotely in a variety of care contexts.





Category: Connected Health International Perspectives Workforces Considerations

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 1 year ago

Webinar: User Centered and Experiential Approaches to Designing Smart Assistive Technology


Presented by: Sander van Berlo, Director at Onmi B.V., the Netherlands

Recorded On: 2 October 2015

This webinar was specifically held and recorded for the Community Care Smart Assistive Technology Collaborative Platform.  Introduced by Eleanor Horton,  Expert Reference Group member and Senior Lecturer in Nursing at the University of the Sunshine Coast.

This is part of a series of sessions being facilitated by Community Resourcing for the Community Care Smart Assistive Technology Collaborative.



Category: Connected Health International Perspectives Mobile Technologies Research Videos

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 1 year ago

Webinar: Do Change, European Smart Assistive Technology Project Disrupting and empowering individuals


Presented by: Sander van Berlo, Director at Onmi B.V., the Netherlands

Recorded On: 2 October 2015

This webinar was specifically held and recorded for the Community Care Smart Assistive Technology Collaborative Platform.  Introduced by Eleanor Horton,  Expert Reference Group member and Senior Lecturer in Nursing at the University of the Sunshine Coast.

This is part of a series of sessions being facilitated by Community Resourcing for the Community Care Smart Assistive Technology Collaborative.







Category: Connected Health International Perspectives Mobile Technologies Research Videos

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 1 year ago

School-based Telerehabilitation In Occupational Therapy: Using Telerehabilitation Technologies to Promote Improvements in Student Performance


Author: Melanie Joy Criss

Published by: International Journal of Telerehabilitation

Year of Publication: 2013

This article discusses the use of telerehabilitation technologies in occupational therapy for schoolbased practice. Telerehabilitation, for the purpose of this program, included the implementation of occupational therapy services via twoway interactive videoconferencing technology. The subjects included in this pilot program were children, ages 6 to 11 years, who attended an online charter school and had difficulties in the areas of fine motor and/or visual motor skills which impacted success with handwriting. Each participant completed a virtual evaluation and six 30 minute intervention sessions. The Print Tool™ Assessment was used to determine progress pre and post program. A learning coach/student satisfaction survey was given at the end of the program to determine participant satisfaction. Outcomes revealed improvements in handwriting performance for most students who participated in the program and high satisfaction rates reported by all participants.Category: Connected Health Rural & Remote Service Delivery

Added by Tony Shaw · 1 year ago

Video capture virtual reality as a flexible and effective rehabilitation tool


Authors: Patrice L Weiss, Debbie Rand, Noomi Katz and Rachel Kizony

Published by: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

Published: 2004

Video capture virtual reality (VR) uses a video camera and software to track movement in a single plane without the need to place markers on specific bodily locations. The user's image is thereby embedded within a simulated environment such that it is possible to interact with animated graphics in a completely natural manner. Although this technology first became available more than 25 years ago, it is only within the past five years that it has been applied in rehabilitation. The objective of this article is to describe the way this technology works, to review its assets relative to other VR platforms, and to provide an overview of some of the major studies that have evaluated the use of video capture technologies for rehabilitation.

Category: Connected Health Future Trends & Possibilies International Perspectives Operational Technology Virtual Environments

Added by Tony Shaw · 1 year ago

Designing The Consumer-Centered Telehealth & eVisit Experience


 Author/s:Kyra Bobinet, MD MPH, John Petito, MS

Prepared for: The Office of National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

This white paper covers key elements of design for consumer-centered telehealth. Given the rapid growth of telehealth and overall disruption of healthcare reimbursement and care delivery, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) commissioned a design session focused on this topic on April 10, 2015 with over 30 stakeholders in attendance.

Category: Connected Health International Perspectives Research Workforces Considerations

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Influencing Factors in the Design of Smart Homes for Persons with Disabilities


UTARI collaborated with H-E-B and Operation Finally Home to provide technology and research integration of automated and robotic devices in home settings.  In 2014, we supported the development of two (2) Smart Homes to benefit wounded warriors. Read more about the HEB Project here.


https://youtu.be/LHLK62FL-VQ


This video features Mike McNair 

Mike McNair is the Automation and Intelligent Systems Director at The University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute (UTARI).  He joined the Research Institute in October 2013 initially overseeing the research in Unmanned Systems and Assistive Technologies; his responsibilities were later expanded to include oversight in Advanced Manufacturing and Sensor Development.

McNair received a Bachelor’s degree in Physics from Texas A&M University in 1982.  He later received a Master’s degree in Systems Engineering from The George Washington University in 2013.  He also holds an active membership with the Program Management Institute (PMI) with a Project Management Professional (PMP) certification.  His direct unmanned systems experience includes the dual roles of Chief Architect and Chief Software Engineer on a large UGV and UAV System of Systems effort from the U.S. Army.  Included in his background is engineering and project leadership across multiple engineering and application domains.  McNair has authored or coauthored multiple journal and conference publications, is a current member of the SAE AS-4 (JAUS) standards group and has presented at several industry conferences and symposiums.

Category: Connected Health Mobile Technologies Robotics Smart Homes & Environmental Controls Videos

Added by Elizabeth Dodd · 2 years ago

Support self management:assistive technology to support people with chronic disease



Authors: Huiru Zheng, Chris Nugent, Paul McCullagh, Yan Huang, Shumei Zhang, William Burns, Richard Davies, Norman Black,

Peter Wright, Sue Mawson, Christopher Eccleston, Mark Hawley and Gail Mountain

Published by:Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare

Year of publication: 2010


We have developed a personalised self management system to support self management of chronic conditions with support from health-care professionals. Accelerometers are used to measure gross levels of activity, for example walking around the house, and used to infer higher level activity states, such as standing, sitting and lying. A smart phone containing an accelerometer and a global positioning system (GPS) module can be used to monitor outdoor activity, providing both activity and location based information. Heart rate, blood pressure and weight are recorded and input to the system by the user. A decision support system (DSS) detects abnormal activity and distinguishes life style patterns. The DSS is used to assess the self management process, and automates feedback to the user, consistent with the achievement of their life goals. We have found that telecare and assistive technology is feasible to support self management for chronic conditions within the home and local community environments.





Category: Communication Connected Health Mobile Technologies Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Matching technologies of home automation, robotics, assistance, geriatric telecare and telemedicine


Authors: Francesco Franshimon, PhD and Michiel Brink, MSc

Published by: Journal of Gerontechnology

Year of publication: 2009


The aging society could have a greater societal impact than the current financial crisis. The percentage of older adults has increased while the size of the health care workforce has remained constant. Home automation, robotics, assistive technology, geriatric telecare and telemedicine can support independence in older adults and diminish the health care burden. Currently, delivering services through these technologies is accomplished mainly through stand-alone systems. Multiple stand-alone systems in one dwelling become a multidisciplinary technological challenge of risks and benefits. Ideally, only those technology mediated services requested at a particular moment should be provided. This calls for a reduction in the barriers between healthcare and technology disciplines and an intelligent network using software agents supporting optimal integration and interoperability to increase the quality of life of older adults and decrease the healthcare burden in our aging society.

Category: Communication Connected Health Robotics Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Smart home technologies for health and social care support (review)


Authors: S. Martin, G. Kelly, WG. Kernohan, B. McCreight and C. Nugent

Published by: The Cochrane Library

Year of Publication: 2008


People who are ill (physically or mentally), or who are frail, may find it difficult to meet their everyday personal and social needs at home. Healthcare providers are trying to find ways to support more people at home, but finding home care workers and the money to fund this help is challenging. Advances in technology have created new devices to help support people.

New devices are already starting to be used, such as mobile phones tailored to health care, or electronic sensors that sound alarms in emergency situations. Another new technology is sensors. Sensors can be placed in everyday appliances in the home, like the fridge, cooker or the door, and can send information to healthcare providers. Providers can find out how people are doing in their homes and then make decisions about their care, such as how often to visit the home. Homes with these technologies are called ’smart homes’.

As with many new technologies, smart home technologies are often used without first testing if they are effective. This review aimed to determine what effect any type of smart home technologies have on people. The review produced a significant volume of literature on the use of smart technologies within health care, but there were no studies testing their effectiveness. The effects of smart technologies to support people in their homes are not known. Better quality research is needed.

Category: Communication Connected Health International Perspectives Smart Homes & Environmental Controls Social Engagement

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Workforce Development for Assisted Living Technology:understanding roles, delivery and workforce needs


Authors: Dr Andrea Wigfield, Dr Sian Moore, Dr Christina Buse and Dr Gary

Published by: University of Leeds

Date of publication: May 2012


Assisted Living Technology (ALT), including telecare and telehealth, digital participation services, and wellness services, is increasingly being offered to individuals in need of social care support as a way of assisting them to maintain independence and to promote quality of life at home. It is recognised that the delivery of Assisted Living Services (ALS) (the term used to refer to this collection of services) has implications for the workforce in the social care and health sectors.

Category: Connected Health Domestic Assistance International Perspectives Workforces Considerations

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Virtual humans for connected health


Authors: Gunner Gamborg 

Published By: WFOT Bulletin

Published On: May 2015 


There is a growing need for applications that can dynamically interact with aging populations to gather information, monitor their health care, provide information, or even act as companions. Virtual human agents or virtual characters offer a technology that can enable human users to overcome the confusing interfaces found in current human-computer interactions. These artificially intelligent virtual characters have speech recognition, natural language and vision that will allow human users to interact with their computers in a more natural way. Additionally, sensors may be used to monitor the environment for specific behaviors that can be fused into a virtual human system. As a result, the virtual human may respond to a patient or elderly person in a manner that will have a powerful affect on their living situation. This paper will describe the virtual human technology developed and some current applications that apply the technology to virtual patients for mental health diagnosis and clinician training. Additionally the paper will discuss possible ways in which the virtual humans may be utilized for assisted health care and for the integration of multi-modal input to enhance the virtual human system.

Category: Communication Connected Health International Perspectives Medication Management Smart Homes & Environmental Controls Social Engagement

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago