Smart AT General

iPad Apps for Complex Communication Support Needs: Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)


Author: Call Scotland


This 'wheel' of AAC Apps by Sally Millar and Gillian McNeill of CALL Scotland, provides a categorised guide to iPad Apps for people with complex communication support needs, who may need to use some form(s) of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC).

There are many hundreds of communication apps and deciding how to categorise them - never mind identifying the best fit to meet the needs of an individual user - is complicated. We define some Apps (from 12 o'clock round to 6) as potential full 'expressive' communication systems. Whether text and/or symbol based, these tend to be highly featured, and as a defining feature, include text to speech, a built-in symbol library, at least one or two sample pre-stored user vocabulary sets, and an onscreen message bar to allow for sentence/message building.

Other Apps (from 6 o'clock round to 9) are classed as more 'simple' forms of communication. These may provide basic, functional ways of expressing needs and making choices, or for recording news or stories. They contain limited, if any, starter content and will be customised for the user from 'bottom-up' using familiar photos and pictures, and recorded messages. Others may use the iPad to mirror and add speech output to particular low tech communication approaches such as PECS. Finally, many are useful for building basic vocabulary and language skills, receptively as much as expressively.

Users may use a 'set' of various Apps from different categories at different times - there is no single 'best' App.

Most Apps are controlled by direct touch, and many (but not all), will run under switch control within iOS 7 (onwards) Accessibility settings. A few were specifically designed for switch access and these are marked in this wheel with small red 's' (beside App icon).

The CALL Scotland AAC Apps wheel does not include every App available in each category. It shows Apps that CALL finds useful: reliable, relatively straightforward to use; reasonable/good value for money; and / or that stand out in their category for some reason.

The AAC Apps wheel was originally published as an A3 poster, but works equally well (only smaller!) as an A4 leaflet. The App names on the electronic version are 'clickable' links, taking you directly to more information about the individual App on the UK iTunes site.

iPad Apps for Complex Communication Support Needs was last updated in June 2015

Revision changes

June 2016

Apps removed - AAC Ferret, EasySpeak HD, Autismate 365, Answers Yes/No, AAC 123

Apps added - Tools 2 Talk+, Totaltalk AAC, CoughDrop, AAC Speak, Snap Scene, iSpeak Button Series, Board Communicator, Early Language Screening Tool Bundle

January 2016

Tools 2 Talk is no longer available to purchase and has been removed from the wheel. We have added an 's' to Pictello, as switches can be configured for playing a story.

May 2015

There has been no change to the App categories, only to the Apps listed. The number of Apps has increased to 77, which includes Tool 2 Talk, a resource for creating and printing symbolised communication resources, detailed separately given the App type.

Category: Communication Mobile Technologies Smart AT General

Added by Elizabeth Dodd · 1 year ago

Traditional Telehealth Model is ‘Dead’ as Wearables Take Over: CCSATC Expert Kevin Doughty


Author: Natasha Egan

Published By: Australian Ageing Agenda Technology Review 

Published:  2016

Dr. Kevin Doughty is a CCSATC Expert Reference group member and Director of the Centre for Usable Home Technologies (CUHTec) at the Universities of Coventry, Newcastle and York. A leading expert in the use of ICT in aged care, Dr. Doughty has urged providers to be agile when it comes to choosing technology, citing Telehealth boxes that have been "overtaken" by more suitable wearable devices. 

"That equipment should be taken off from the shelf and put straight into the bin because they have been overtaken by things that better, more usable, and far more conducive to the public." Dr Doughty told Technology Review. 

All the sign were pointing to a future involving wearable devices, rather than "Telehealth boxes," said Dr Doughty. 

Clients were constrained by traditional Telehealth equipments that had to used in the home at a particular time, he said. Instead, devices needed to become ambulatory so they could be worn by individuals, who were increasingly interested in something that matched their persona. 

Please follow the link below to access the full article: 

Traditional telehealth model is ‘dead’ as wearables take over: expert

Category: Future Trends & Possibilies International Perspectives Smart AT General

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Webinar: Smart Assistive Technology Driving Changes in Management of Continence


Author: CCSATC & Simavita

Published By: CCSATC 

Published On: 17 March 2016

In this webinar, Leonie Mulheran from Simavita will discuss the prevalence of incontinence and importance of management in both the younger and the aged population and gender specific issues. Importantly, Leonie will discuss the role that Smart Assistive Technology could play for the Service Provider & the Consumer as well as economic impact and future possibilities. 

This webinar can be accessed by following the link below:

Smart Assistive Technology Driving Changes in Management of Continence

Category: Domestic Assistance Future Trends & Possibilies Local Perspectives Mobile Technologies Quality & Standards Smart AT General Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

How Playing 3D Video Games Could Help Boost Memory


Author: Honor Whiteman

Published By: Medilexicon International Ltd.

Published On: 12 December 2015


Good news for all of you video game buffs out there; a new study finds playing 3D video games may help boost memory, possibly opening the door to a new way to maintain cognitive functioning as we age.

 

Video games are not normally viewed in a positive light in terms of health; previous studies have claimed they promote sedentary behavior, while violent video games have been linked to aggressive behavior and reduced self-control.

 

Increasingly, however, researchers are finding video games may have some benefits. Earlier this year, Medical News Today reported on a study that found Tetris could reduce cravings, while other research suggested story-based video games could help people with autism.

 

Now, researchers from the University of California-Irvine (UCI) suggest the benefits of video games could reach even further, possibly helping people with dementia or other conditions associated with memory loss.

 

They publish their findings in The Journal of Neuroscience.

 

3D video games improved memory performance by 12%

 

Study coauthors Craig Stark and Dane Clemenson, of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning & Memory at UCI, asked a number of non-gamer college students to play one of two video games for 30 minutes daily for 2 weeks - either the 2D game "Angry Birds" or the 3D game "Super Mario 3D world."

 

Students took part in memory tests both before and after the 2-week gaming period, which involved them viewing images of specific everyday objects. They were then shown images of the same objects, new objects and objects that differed slightly from the original images and were asked to categorize each one.

 

Such tests engage the hippocampus - the brain region associated with memory and learning - according to Stark, and previous studies he conducted showed that the ability to perform well on such tests reduces as we age.

 

Compared with students who played the 2D game over the 2-week period, those who played the 3D game improved memory performance by around 12%.

 

To put this in context, the team notes that between the ages of 45-70, memory performance normally reduces by around 12%, suggesting that 3D video games could help maintain cognitive functioning as we age.

 

But why do 3D video games appear to boost memory while 2D games do not?

 

3D games may increase neuronal growth, signaling in the hippocampus

 

Previous studies by Clemenson and colleagues found rodents that explored an environment showed increased neuronal growth and signaling in the hippocampus, and the team notes there are similarities between the environment the rodents explored and the 3D game the students played.

 

Stark explains that 3D games contain more spatial information than 2D, giving the player more to explore. What is more, 3D games are significantly more complex, meaning the player has more to learn.

 

Stark adds that video games activate cognitive processes, including visual, spatial, attentional, motivational and emotional processes, as well as critical thinking, problem-solving and working memory.

 

"It's quite possible that by explicitly avoiding a narrow focus on a single [...] cognitive domain and by more closely paralleling natural experience, immersive video games may be better suited to provide enriching experiences that translate into functional gains," he explains.

 

Next, the team plans to determine whether 3D video games or other real-world exploration experiences can help reverse cognitive declines in older individuals.

 

"Can we use this video game approach to help improve hippocampus functioning? It's often suggested that an active, engaged lifestyle can be a real factor in stemming cognitive aging," says Stark. "While we can't all travel the world on vacation, we can do many other things to keep us cognitively engaged and active. Video games may be a nice, viable route."

 

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/303789.php

Category: Future Trends & Possibilies International Perspectives Research Smart AT General Videos Virtual Environments

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Google Glass Apps for People with Disability Trialed by Telstra


Author: Media Access Australia 

Published By: Media Access Australia 

Published:  2016 

"The potential benefits of Google Glass for people with disability are becoming a reality thanks to a partnership between Telstra and app developers b2cloud.

Two Telstra employees – Kelly Schulz, who is blind, and Peter Miller, who is hearing impaired – were each given a Google Glass device with assistive apps installed. “These apps have been developed to see what could be done with technology to make the lives of hearing and vision impaired people a little easier,” said Telstra on itsblog(link is external).

In the video embedded below, Schulz demonstrates shopping using an optical recognition app on her Glass device. The app identifies a bag of peas and reads out the label. “To have that hands-free ability to identify objects, being connected to a fast network, being connected to the world and have it all private in your ear, on your head – fantastic!” said Schulz.

For Miller, an app provides a transcript of conversations in real time right before his eyes. “I can be a more active participant in meetings and conversations and I can walk into any meeting whatsoever without needing to book any special [captioning] services,” he said.

Tim O’Leary, Telstra’s Chief Sustainability Officer, said, “It’s the same technology for able people and people with disability. […] There’s a real sort of equity I think with the technology. The design is the same for everybody and that makes a huge difference for people’s self-esteem.”

Although Google Glass is not yet available to purchase in Australia, projects such as this will help ensure that the benefits of the technology for people with disability are realised by the time it enters the market. However, price may be a barrier for some with the device currently selling for over US$2,000."

Category: Hearing Smart AT General

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Google Glass Apps for People with Disability Trialed by Telstra


 Author: Media Access Australia

Published by: Media Access Australia

Published: 2012

"The potential benefits of Google Glass for people with disability are becoming a reality thanks to a partnership between Telstra and app developers b2cloud.

Two Telstra employees – Kelly Schulz, who is blind, and Peter Miller, who is hearing impaired – were each given a Google Glass device with assistive apps installed. “These apps have been developed to see what could be done with technology to make the lives of hearing and vision impaired people a little easier,” said Telstra on itsblog(link is external).

In the video embedded below, Schulz demonstrates shopping using an optical recognition app on her Glass device. The app identifies a bag of peas and reads out the label. “To have that hands-free ability to identify objects, being connected to a fast network, being connected to the world and have it all private in your ear, on your head – fantastic!” said Schulz.

For Miller, an app provides a transcript of conversations in real time right before his eyes. “I can be a more active participant in meetings and conversations and I can walk into any meeting whatsoever without needing to book any special [captioning] services,” he said.

Tim O’Leary, Telstra’s Chief Sustainability Officer, said, “It’s the same technology for able people and people with disability. […] There’s a real sort of equity I think with the technology. The design is the same for everybody and that makes a huge difference for people’s self-esteem.”

Although Google Glass is not yet available to purchase in Australia, projects such as this will help ensure that the benefits of the technology for people with disability are realised by the time it enters the market. However, price may be a barrier for some with the device currently selling for over US$2,000."

Access the full story here: http://www.mediaaccess.org.au/latest_news/digital-technology/google-glass-apps-for-people-with-disability-trialled-by-telstra

Category: Hearing Smart AT General

Added by Lisa Kelly · 1 year ago

Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility


Authors:  font-style: italic; line-height: 22.8667px;">Rachel E Cowan, Benjamin J Fregly, Michael L Boninger, Leighton Chan, Mary M Rodgers and

David J Reinkensmeyer

Published by: Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation

Pubished on: 2012


Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe.

The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs,prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments.

Category: International Perspectives Mobility Smart AT General

Added by Tony Shaw · 1 year ago

Assisted Living Technology in social care: workforce development implications


Authors: Andrea Wigfield, Katy Wright, Elizabeth Burtney, Diane Buddery

Published by: Journal of Assistive Technologies

Published on: 2013


Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to look at the implications of the increasing use of Assisted Living

Technology in the social care sector and to assess the implications for the workforce in terms of job roles, skills, knowledge, training, and support.

Design/methodology/approach – A mixed methods approach was used, through a quantitative electronic survey of staff working in social care (as well as some health care) organisations in England, and three qualitative case studies of local authorities.

Findings – The research shows that the organisations involved in delivering Assisted Living Technology, the types of Assisted Living Technology being introduced, and the way in which it is being delivered, have implications for job roles and the skills and knowledge needed by staff. The associated training and workforce development similarly varies across the social care sector; it is ad hoc, disparate, and provided primarily by individual employers or by suppliers and manufacturers.

Research limitations/implications – There is a need for a standardised Assisted Living Technology workforce development approach which can be used across the social care sector.

Practical implications – The varied nature of Assisted Living Technology providers and delivery models presents a challenge to the development and implementation of a standardised programme of workforce development.

Originality/value – This paper presents the results of new empirical research arising from a quantitative and qualitative study of the workforce development implications of Assisted Living Technology in the English social care sector.



Category: Domestic Assistance International Perspectives Smart AT General Workforces Considerations

Added by Tony Shaw · 1 year ago

Dr Kevin Doughty Presentation from The Embedding and Mainstreaming Smart AT in Community Care Service Provision Event


In this one day interactive Workshop held in Brisbane on 8 September 2015 , Dr Doughty demonstrated the  implementation of Smart Assistive Technology into Service Delivery drawing from proven International best practice in community care service delivery.


Due to popular demand we have provided a link to Dr Doughty's presentation below:



https://www.dropbox.com/s/l2t8enc0bi5lufi/Embedding%20%26%20Mainstreaming%20Smart%20Assistive%20Technology%20PowerPoint.pdf?dl=0



Category: Future Trends & Possibilies International Perspectives Smart AT General

Added by Elizabeth Dodd · 2 years ago

Technologies for Dementia Care in the Home


An informative webinar presented by Dr. Carrie Peterson on how the use of technology can assist with dementia care in the home.

About Carrie Peterson:

Carrie Peterson, PhD, has degrees in Human Services, Psychology, Gerontology, and her PhD thesis in Engineering was on Quality of Life and technology in dementia care. Carrie has been a volunteer, private carer, worked in day care programs, hospice, and in research over the past 30 years. She is an independent consultant in aging, long-term care, and dementia services. Carrie has worked with private families, long-term care facilities, universities, businesses, start-ups, research centers, Non-Governmental Organizations, and health and social care services in Denmark. Carrie focuses on innovation in dementia care, working to develop and evaluate health and social care services for people and families living with dementia. 

Click the link below to view the webinar:


Category: International Perspectives Smart AT General Videos

Added by Elizabeth Dodd · 2 years ago

Assistive Technology for Students with Learning Disabilities


Prepared by: Gabrielle Young, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Memorial University of Newfoundland and Jeffrey MacCormack, M.Ed., Doctoral Student, Queen’s University

Published on:  June 10th, 2014

 

Assistive technology refers to the devices and services that are used to increase, maintain, or improve the capabilities of a student with a disability (Dell, Newton, & Petroff, 2012). While the phrase assistive technology may make us think of computers and computerized devices, assistive technology can also be very low-tech. For example, pencil-grips (the molded plastic grips that slip over a pencil) are considered assistive technology. Assistive technology that helps students with learning disabilities includes computer programs and tablet applications that provide text-to-speech (e.g., Kurzweil 3000), speech-to-text (e.g., Dragon Naturally Speaking), word prediction capabilities (e.g., WordQ), and graphic organizers (e.g., Inspiration).

In comparison to other interventions, assistive technology may have a significant effect in helping students with disabilities progress towards the goals outlined on their Individual Education Plans (Watson, Ito, Smith, & Andersen, 2010). Assistive technology helps in two ways: it can help the student learn how to complete the task and it can help to bypass an area of difficulty. For example, when a student decides to listen to a digital version of a book, they are bypassing an area of difficulty. However, if the student focuses on the computer screen as highlighted words are read aloud, they can learn unfamiliar words.

To read more go to; http://ldatschool.ca/technology/assistive-technology/

 

Category: Communication Smart AT General

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

Technology to Care- Implementation Plan to embed electronic assistive technology (eAT) in Social Care


Contributors: Diane Buddery, Skills for Care, England, Linda Currin, Skills for Care and Development , Audrey Cund, University of the West of Scotland , Ian Fricker, Scottish Social Services Council , Meta Keenan, Northern Ireland Social Services Council , Mared Llwyd, Care Council for Wales, Sheila Lyons, Care Council for Wales, Rebecca Nancarrow, Leonard Cheshire Disability, Annie O’Reilly, Social Care in Partnership (Western Bay), Wales, Oliver Stykuc-Dean, Buckinghamshire County, England , Trevor Taylor, The Cedar Foundation, Northern Ireland, Diane Webb, Quarriers, Scotland.

Published by: Technology to Care

This implementation plan should be read in conjunction with Technology to Care: A Workforce Learning Strategy to Embed Electronic Assistive Technology (eAT) in Social Care 1. The recommendations set out in the strategy form the basis of the implementation plan, which sets out a series of operational objectives with related actions or activities for different stakeholders.



Category: International Perspectives Smart AT General

Added by Elizabeth Dodd · 2 years ago

Technology to Care – Knowledge and skills sets to embed electronic assistive technology (eAT) in social care


New electronic technologies are playing an ever greater part in everyday life for us all. Most of us have a mobile phone that we wouldn’t be without. Many of us shop online, travel by satnav, talk by video link to friends or family far away, and download apps for practical or leisure use. We may also arrange for lights to come on while we’re out, set alarms to detect intruders, or arrange for TV programmes to be recorded while we’re busy doing something else.

People who use social care services can and should enjoy the same benefits that the changing world of technology can bring to us all; some already do. Many are also finding that specific technology-based systems or devices have an increasingly important part to play in supporting their safety, well-being and independence. This is true not only for independence in a practical sense but also for enabling greater participation in family, social and economic life. Technology, especially digital technology, can bring substantial benefits in terms of reducing isolation and improving people’s motivation and well-being day to day. Such benefits apply to people of all ages. Individuals can now enjoy a much wider range of choices because of electronic technologies, and these in turn can help to nurture more personalised approaches to care and support.

Category: International Perspectives Smart AT General

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Technology to Care – A workforce learning strategy to embed electronic assistive technology (eAT) in Social Care


Author: Skills for Care and Development (SfC&D)

Published By: Technology to Care UK

Published: 2014

Technology is playing an increasingly important part in the provision of care and support. This Workforce Learning Strategy has been developed by Skills for Care and Development (SfC&D) to support employers as they equip the workforce to utilise technology effectively to promote person centred approaches and independence, choice and well-being in the lives of the people they support. An ageing population, integrated public services, person centred approaches and digital innovations are amongst the key drivers for change in health and social care services in the UK. 1 2 3 This Strategy has been developed to consider the future needs of the workforce specifically in relation to the role that eAT can play in improving the delivery of care services. In particular, the Strategy is intended to support employers across the UK to address the learning needs of their workforce in relation to eAT and to invest more confidently in eAT related training.


A number of initiatives informed the direction of the Strategy, including a review of policy across the UK and a mix of research methods to analyse learning and development provision and its effectiveness in addressing workforce needs. Consultation and engagement events around the UK involved eAT champions, individuals, telecare service managers, care and support providers, occupational therapists, health, housing and third sector workers. The detail of the Strategy was shaped by a steering group of representatives to ensure consistency and consensus across the UK.


The Strategy is aimed primarily at employers and managers within social care services, with an emphasis on action to raise workforce awareness around eAT. It is part of a long term ambition to embed knowledge and skills about eAT in working practices across social care. Whilst the Strategy is addressed primarily to employers, it is highly relevant to other stakeholders such as suppliers/manufacturers and learning providers who also have an important role to play in achieving change.

To access the complete pdf. document please click here:

http://www.ccwales.org.uk/edrms/146453/


Category: International Perspectives Policy & Funding Smart AT General Workforces Considerations

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Assistive Technology in the Workplace


Author: NDCO - National Disability Coordination Officer Program 

Published By: Deakin University 

Published On: 2014

This booklet provides information about technology that can be used in the workplace by people with a disability.

Follow the link here: 

www.adcet.edu.au/?download=attachment&i=8211-1

Category: Local Perspectives NDIS Smart AT General

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Smart Technology for Healthy Longevity


The key finding of this report by the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering is that a national thrust on the  development and application of smart technology for healthy longevity is vital to ensure a healthy, safe, secure and fulfilling future for the increasing aged population in Australia and the maintenance of a healthy, harmonious and prosperous society.

Category: Local Perspectives Smart AT General Vision

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Older Adults’ Reasons for Using Technology while Ageing in Place


Most older adults prefer to age in place, and supporting older adults to remain in their own homes and communities is also favored by policy makers. Technology can play a role in staying independent, active and healthy. However, the use of technology varies considerably among older adults. This paper aims to provide insight into the reasons older adults use technology in the home.

Category: Smart AT General

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Response to the National Disability Insurance Agency’s Discussion Paper - Towards Solutions for Assistive Technology.


An open response from Dr. Alan Finkel, President of ATSE, to the National Disability Insurance Agency’s Discussion Paper - Towards Solutions for Assistive Technology.

Category: Domestic Assistance NDIS Policy & Funding Smart AT General

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

MAGIC-HAND: A bottle and jar opening machine for people with severe disabilities


Authors: U. Lorentzon, G. Bolmsjö, M. Doyle, D. Carus

Published by: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Strathclyde

Published on:  April 2007

This paper describes the development of a prototype product named MAGIC-HAND that has been developed to open bottles, jars and packages that require a twisting action. Its intended users are people with severe disabilities, who are not capable of using the current range of package opening tools.




Category: Domestic Assistance Smart AT General

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Towards Solutions for Assistive Technology – Discussion Paper


To deliver an empowering, sustainable and nationally consistent approach to ensuring NDIS participants have ready access to the quality assistive technology they require to fully participate in their communities.

Category: NDIS Smart AT General

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Ageing-In-Place: Stronger Focus to Optimise Benefits from Smart Technology


Published by: Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering

Published on: 28 July 2010

Australia needs both an increased national focus on developing and applying smart technology to enable the aged to remain in their homes and new models to fund the deployment of this technology, says a new report from the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering entitled Smart Technology for Healthy Longevity.

Category: Domestic Assistance Local Perspectives Smart AT General

Added by Tony Shaw · 2 years ago

Workplace response to virtual caregiver support and remote home monitoring of elders: the WIN project


Research has demonstrated the health and financial cost to working caregivers of older adults and the cost to business in lost productivity. This paper describes the implementation of the Worker Interactive Networking (WIN) project, a Web-based program designed to support employed caregivers at work. WIN innovatively linked working caregivers via the Internet to home to monitor elders’ status using wireless sensor technology and included an online information and support group for a six-month period.

Twenty-seven employees from thirteen business sites participated. Despite problems with wireless carrier service, feasibility outcomes were achieved. We were able to collect six months of continuous real time data wirelessly from multiple types of homes across 4 states. This model demonstrates that businesses can offer a similar program and not be overwhelmed by employee demand or abuse of technology access. Reluctance to consider home monitoring was apparent and was influenced by familial relationships and values of privacy and independence.

Category: International Perspectives Smart AT General Smart Homes & Environmental Controls Workforces Considerations

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago

The acceptability of assistive technology to older people


Assistive technology (AT) is defined in this paper as ‘any device or system that allows an individual to perform a task that they would otherwise be unable to do, or increases the ease and safety with which the task can be performed’ (Cowan and Turner-Smith 1999). Its importance in contributing to older people’s independence and autonomy is increasingly recognised, but there has been little research into the viability of extensive installations of AT. This paper focuses on the acceptability of AT to older people, and reports one component of a multidisciplinary research project that examined the feasibility, acceptability, costs and outcomes of introducing AT into their homes. Sixty-seven people aged 70 or more years were interviewed in-depth during 2001 to find out about their use and experience of a wide range of assistive technologies. The findings suggest a complex model of acceptability, in which a ‘ felt need’ for assistance combines with ‘product quality’. The paper concludes by considering the tensions that may arise in the delivery of acceptable assistive technology.

Category: Domestic Assistance International Perspectives Smart AT General Smart Homes & Environmental Controls

Added by Ash-Lee Hall · 2 years ago